2011 Approval Ratings – Tony Massarotti

Tony Massarotti is the co-host of the Felger and Mazz show on 98.5 The SportsHub.

A Waltham native, Massarotti also hosts The Baseball Reporters on 98.5, and is a Boston.com sports columnist. He joined the Boston Herald as a sports intern in 1989, joining the likes of Michael Felger, Bill Simmons, Michael Silverman and Paul Perillo. In 1994 he started covering the Red Sox for the Herald, a focus he held until he left the paper in 2008. He then joined Boston.com, and in August 2009, he and Felger started their popular afternoon drive show on 98.5, which has unseated long time ratings champ Glenn Ordway and The Big Show on WEEI. Interestingly, Massarotti, like Felger had been a frequent co-host on the WEEI show in the past. The duo signed a new deal with the station in April of this year.

Once a dogged and capable baseball reporter, Massarotti now focuses on playing the contrarian, especially when it comes to the Patriots – a franchise and fan base that he clearly loathes. He has also proclaimed his love for Derek Jeter, and does an absolutely horrible voice impression of Boston sports fans.

Massarotti  has written or co-written several books, including Dynasty: The Inside Story of How the Red Sox Became a Baseball Powerhouse, as well as bios with Tim Wakefield and most famously, Big Papi: My Story of Big Dreams and Big Hits. Despite these close associations with players he was covering, Massarotti loves to hammer other reporters for being “in the bag” for the Patriots. 

 

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2011 Approval Ratings – Nick Cafardo

Nick Cafardo is the national baseball writer for The Boston Globe.

Cafardo begin his career in Brockton in 1975 before moving to the Quincy Patriot Ledger in 1981. In 1989 he joined The Boston Globe sports staff.

Cafardo has covered both the Red Sox and Patriots during his tenure at the Globe, but his heart is clearly with baseball. During his time on the Patriots beat he was clearly frustrated with the working environment and it reflected in his coverage of the team. Having moved back to baseball, he is noticeably more confortable and in his element.

He is a frequent presence on the various NESN programs, and in the past was in demand on WWZN radio, ESPN Radio and WBZ-TV’s Sports Final.

He is the author of several books, including The Impossible Team: The Worst to First Patriot’s Super Bowl Season, 100 Things Red Sox Fans Should Know and Do Before They Die and Boston Red Sox: Yesterday and Today

Nick’s son, Ben Cafardo works at ESPN in the communications department.

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2011 Approval Ratings – Michael Holley

Today’s subject is WEEI’s Michael Holley.

An Ohio native, Holley worked for the Akron Beacon Journal before joining the Boston Globe in 1997. He was the Celtics beat writer before being moved into the columnist role. At the time, he was also a frequent guest on WEEI, especially on The Big Show, prior to the WEEI/Globe schism.

In September, 2001, Holley left the Globe to join the Chicago Tribune as a columnist. He quickly realized that he had made a mistake, and has spoken of the impact that 9/11 had on him at that time. By January, 2002, he was back at the Globe, and remained there until 2005.

In 2004, Holley was working on television on Fox Sports Net’s I, Max alongside Max Kellerman. He has also done ESPN’s Around the Horn. Locally, he has been a regular on CSNNE, and has been the host of Celtics Now.

In 2005, he was named to replace Bob Neumeier alongside Dale Arnold on the WEEI midday show. In February of this year, it was announced that Holley would be moving to The Big Show as permanent co-host alongside Glenn Ordway.

Holley has published three books – Patriot Reign, Never Give Up and Red Sox Rule.

His fourth book, War Room: Bill Belichick and the Patriot Legacy is due to be released on October 4th, 2011.

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2011 Approval Ratings – Tom Caron

Tom Caron serves as Red Sox studio host for NESN.

The Lewiston, Maine native was a journalism major at  Saint Michael’s College in Vermont. He began his television career as an intern during his junior year in college at WPTZ-TV in Plattsburgh, NY, where he reported on the  Montreal Canadiens and Montreal Expos. Jobs at WNNE-TV in Hanover, NH, and WGME-TV in Portland, ME followed. He joined WPXT-TV in Portland in 1993, and was the radio play-by-play man for the AHL Portland Pirates.

In 1995 he joined NESN as co-host of “Front Row,” a nightly sports magazine program. (Kristen Mastroianni was his co-host.) He also hosted the Bruins telecasts from 1997 to 2004, and was a Red Sox reporter during games. After two years on the road with the team, Caron became the studio host for the Red Sox telecasts.

Caron has also done play-by-play for NESN’s Hockey East telecasts. Caron is a frequent fill-in on WEEI. He writes a weekly sports column for the Portland Press Herald.

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2011 Approval Ratings – Michael Silverman

Yes, that was the best picture I could find of Silverman. The guy is a ghost. Even the photo on his Twitter page isn’t of him.

Michael Silverman covers the Red Sox for the Boston Herald. He’s a lifer there, having come in with the illustrious 1989 class that included Michael Felger, Tony Massarotti, Bill Simmons and Paul Perillo.

He’s been covering the Red Sox since 1995. He’s not a guy you hear a whole lot from on the radio and television airwaves, though he does make some appearances. He doesn’t generally inject a lot of opinion into his pieces, but his tagline this season of the 2011 Red Sox being the Best Team Ever has gotten some play.

He was friendly with former Sox ace Pedro Martinez, which often made him a go-to guy on Pedro stories, even after the pitcher had left town.

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2011 Approval Ratings – Peter Abraham

Peter Abraham is a Red Sox reporter for the Boston Globe.

A native of New Bedford, MA, Abraham joined the Globe in 2009. He attended UMass-Amherst.

Prior to coming to the Globe, covered the Yankees for The Journal News beginning in 2005, and spent four years prior to that covering the Mets. Before coming to New York in 1999, He covered the University of Connecticut men’s basketball team for the Norwich (Conn.) Bulletin.

Other publications Abraham has written for include Baseball America, Slam, Basketball Digest, Sports Illustrated, Sports Nippon, Metropolitan Golfer, Basketball Times and Backstreets.

Prolific in the ways of new media, Abraham was one of the first credentialed baseball writers to be as well-known for his blog coverage of the team as for his print coverage. He is also very active on Twitter, often engaging with and taking on fans through that medium.

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2011 Approval Ratings – Dan Shaughnessy

The voice and face of Boston sports – at least according to the Boston Globe – is Dan Shaughnessy.

Shaughnessy is the Globe’s front-page go-to guy for all major sports stories, the latest example being all the front page runs he received during the Bruins Stanley Cup chase.

Shaughnessy grew up in Groton, MA, and is a graduate of Holy Cross. He started his professional career with the Baltimore Sun in the late 1970′s, serving as Orioles beat writer. He moved on to the Globe in 1981, where he covered the beat for the Red Sox and Celtics before moving to the columnist role. In the last couple of years, he has also been writing the occasional column for SI.com. He is a nine-time Massachusetts Sportswriter of the Year, and at least eight times he has been selected as one of Americas top-ten sports columnists by Associated Press Sports Editors.

His formulaic columns, ripjobs, unabashed agendas and contrarian opinions have earned him the title of The Most Hated Man in Boston. His work has inspired his own watchdog blog, the entertaining Dan Shaughnessy Watch.

Shaughnessy has written at least 11 books, including The Curse of the Bambino, The Legend of the Curse of the Bambino and Reversing the Curse: Inside the 2004 Boston Red Sox. Other credits include Senior Year: A Father, A Son, and High School Baseball and Ever Green The Boston Celtics: A History in the Words of Their Players, Coaches, Fans and Foes, from 1946 to the Present.

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