“The Greatest Clutch Hitter in the History of the Boston Red Sox.”

What more can be said about David Ortiz?

“The Greatest Clutch Hitter in the History of the Boston Red Sox.” I guess that about sums it up. Even before last night’s bottom of the ninth heroics, Ortiz had that title. So much so that Red Sox ownership had a plaque made up with that title inscribed on it. Chris Snow reports that after Ortiz hit a walk-off home run last night, it was decided to present the slugger with the plaque now instead of waiting for the offseason. David Heuschkel has John Henry noting that Ortiz is the best he’s ever seen with the game on the line, as well as being one of the nicest guys around. Jeff Horrigan has manager Terry Francona saying that you just never get tired of this stuff. Steven Krasner paints the picture of yet another walk off homer by Ortiz. David Borges reports on Ortiz and the Red Sox shocking the Angels once again.

Lenny Megliola says that simply put, Ortiz is Mr Clutch. Dan Shaughnessy gushes about Ortiz, as he writes his usual post-Labor day column directed towards the new college students in the area. Jon Couture records a nice conversation between Tim Wakefield and Manny Ramirez, the knuckleball pitcher told Ramirez that Manny was going to win the game for them. Ramirez replied that Ortiz had already staked that claim. We know what happened next. Joe Haggerty writes that last night was a familiar story for the Red Sox and their fans at Fenway. David Ortiz once again is the hero.

Tony Massarotti notes that before the Ortiz home run, the Red Sox did all the little things right in order to get themselves in position for the win. They pitched well and played defense. Sean McAdam looks at the strong performance of Wakefield, who held the Angels to two runs in a complete game performance, picking up his 15th win of the season. Tony Chamberlain focuses on Wakefield’s teammates putting him in a position to pick up the victory. Horrigan looks at Wakefield getting a Big assist from Papi.

Alex Speier examines what manager Terry Francona is going to manage fatigue and exhaustion over the course of the long season for his club. An article with no byline in the ProJo says that you cannot compare Jonathan Papelbon to Francisco Rodriguez. (Sean McAdam’s name has been added to the article since this was originally compiled.) Shaughnessy writes that this series with the Angels is a fall preview of things to come. Horrigan has a brief bit on Kelly Shoppach rejoining the big club. Borges reports that Shoppach is glad to be back with the club, despite nearly being traded last month. Howard Bryant (subscription only) examines how athletes and ESPN have reacted to the tragedy of hurricane Katrina, he starts with David Ortiz, who quietly writes a check for relief, but otherwise keeps quiet on his feelings about the quality of the coverage given to the event and the makeup of the victims. Bryant notes other athletes contributions to the cause and makes suggestions for others. Mark Shanahan in the Globe has an interview with the former wide of Jose Canseco, who is coming out with her own tell-all book.

Snow’s notebook examines how Johnny Damon just keeps playing through all the nagging injuries he’s had to endure this season. Horrigan’s notebook looks at the sterling defense turned in by John Olerud at first base, and also notes that Craig Hansen will likely not be called to the big club this month. Krasner’s notebook looks at the case for MVP for David Ortiz. Heuschkel’s notebook looks at another strong outing for Tim Wakefield. Borges’ notebook looks at Roberto Petagine gathering splinters on the Red Sox bench. Couture’s notebook looks at relief coming from Pawtucket to help the regulars get a little rest now and then.

Michael Felger looks at former Patriot Bobby Hamilton coming back to town with the Raiders and having to struggle with his emotions a little bit in the process. He also looks at linebackers coach Dean Pees and how he is splitting the play calling duties among his linebackers in the absence of Tedy Bruschi. Chris Kennedy looks at the difficulties of preparing for a season opener. Jerome Solomon looks at Corey Dillon, who feels faster and stronger than he did a year ago, and has the advantage of being in the Patriots system for a full year. Ian M Clark examines the high hopes that the Patriots have for tight end Ben Watson. Felger also looks at Bill Belichick and the Patriots getting antsy for tomorrow night to come.

Alan Greenberg and Michael Parente each analyze Randy Moss, what he brings to the field, good and bad, and how the Patriots are preparing to cover him. Tom E Curran looks at the monstrous size of the Oakland defensive line, which he dubs the Santa Claus four – they’re old and they’re fat. Eric McHugh notes the Raiders fascination with players who have “measurable” qualities, such as size and speed. The bigger the better, the faster the better. You can get a lot more information on the Raiders at the Bay Area Sports page, where many of the papers are serving up Raiders and NFL previews today.

Felger’s notebook reveals that we still don’t know who is going to start at cornerback for the Patriots tomorrow night. Curran’s notebook says that this time around, we know what we can expect from Corey Dillon. Parente’s notebook says that we could see Mike Vrabel in any number of positions and roles on the field this season. Kennedy’s notebook tells us that Vrabel’s versatility is a strength for him and the club. Solomon’s notebook reviews the injury report for the Patriots.

Gabe Kahn looks at how the Celtics roster might shake out, as the club has 18 players under contract for only 15 slots. Mark Murphy reports that Tony Allen is facing civil action for an event that took place in Chicago on August 28th. Mike Bogen has a story on Hubie Brown, who enjoys teaching the game that he loves so much. Brown is a member of the 2005 basketball Hall of Fame class.

Nancy Marrapese-Burrell looks at Bruins prospect Brad Boyes. Michael Vega looks at BC running back J. Survival Ross. Bud Collins weighs in on tonight’s quarterfinal match between Andre Agassi and James Blake, which has the makings of a classic.

The Yankees lost to their nemesis, the Devil Rays once again last night. Check the coverage at the New York Sports news page. There are also a number of NFL preview articles in there.

John Molori’s Media Blitz has more on ESPN Radio Boston, as well as a look at Cold Hard Football Facts, and analysis of Dennis and Callahan’s criticism on figures in the New Orleans relief situation.

NESN has Red Sox/Angels at 7:00. ESPN has Mets/Braves at 7:00.

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